Important Information for Families: Are You Interested in Enrolling Your Student in Head Start/Early Head Start?

March 27, 2019

Important Information for Families: Are You Interested in Enrolling Your Student in Head Start/Early Head Start

Families interested in submitting an application for Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) Head Start/Early Head Start program for the 2019/20 school year can enroll, beginning in April.

The Head Start/Early Head Start program is federally-funded and serves three-and four-year-old children with a full school day of educational enrichment activities utilizing research-proven curriculum. In addition, Head Start and Early Head Start services include health and nutrition screenings, mental health services and family support. Free breakfast and lunch are also provided. The Early Head Start program also provides services to pregnant women, infants and toddlers.

Families can submit an application during the following open enrollment windows.

Application Dates and Locations:

Lauderdale Manors Early Learning and Resources Center

1400 NW 14th Court

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311

Location: Cafeteria

April 13, 2019

(Saturday 8:30 – 10:30 a.m.)

April 15 – 18, 2019

(Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)


Sheridan Technical College 

5400 Sheridan Street

Hollywood, FL 33021

Location: Room 123

April 22 – 26, 2019

(Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.)

(Friday 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.)

April 27, 2019

(Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.)


To apply, families must meet the income eligibility requirements as determined by the Department of Health & Human Services 2019 Poverty Guidelines. Families of children with disabilities and foster children are encouraged to apply. Homeless families are also encouraged to apply. To complete an application, parents or guardians must provide:
 

  • Proof of age (child’s original birth certificate or passport)
  • Proof of guardianship (if applicable)
  • Parent photo identification
  • Proof of all household income for the past 12 months (income is defined as the total money earned or received before deductions for all family members)
  • Proof of residence in Broward County

For more information, contact the Head Start/Early Intervention Services Department at 754-321-1961. You can also visit browardschools.com/headstart-vpk.

 

###

ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth-largest school district in the nation and the second-largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has more than 271,500 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 234 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 88 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. Connect with BCPS: visit the website at browardschools.com, follow BCPS on Twitter @browardschools and Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools, and download the free BCPS mobile app.

Source

Broward Parents and Community Organizations Form Action Plan to Help Students Cope with Depression and Trauma

March 25, 2019

Broward Parents and Community Organizations Form Action Plan to Help Students Cope with Depression and Trauma

In the wake of two suicides that devastated the community this past week, parents and representatives from organizations throughout Broward County came together yesterday to discuss what they can do to help students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas (MSD) High School and throughout the county cope with trauma and depression. In attendance were representatives from Children’s Services Council, City of Parkland, Jewish Adoption and Family Care Options (JAFCO), Henderson Behavioral Health, Broward County Public Schools, Jewish Family Services, MSD staff, United Way, Broward County, Broward Sheriff’s Office, Coral Springs Police Department and more. 

A preliminary plan was created for a community-wide campaign to reach and empower parents with tools to help protect their children. The first step was to develop a common message to cut through the clutter, so parents and youth have the same understanding about warning signs and where to turn for help.

It is important for parents to talk with their children and be able to recognize signs of personal crisis that could lead to suicide. Parents need to ask the screening yes-or-no questions from The Columbia Protocol to identify if someone is in crisis, and they should not worry that asking about suicide will put the idea into their children’s heads. The questions can be found online at cssrs.columbia.edu. 

“Schools are closed this week for Spring break, and parents want to know where they can get help for their children during this time,” said Cindy Arenberg Seltzer, CEO of Children’s Services Council, who convened the meeting at Eagles’ Haven in Coral Springs. “When school is back in session, families will need tools to help their children.” 

“During the Spring break, I encourage you to take time to speak with your children every day. Dinners are a great time for family conversation,” said Superintendent Robert Runcie. “We need to remove the stigma from talking about suicide.” 

  • The Broward County Resiliency Center (BCRC) at Pines Trail Park Amphitheater, 10561 Trails End, Parkland, has clinicians available from noon to 7 p.m. daily until April 1. Call 954-684-4265.
  • During Spring break, children can visit the Coral Springs Museum of Art, 2855 Coral Springs Drive, where fun activities will be available in a supportive environment.  Call 954-340-5000.
  • Eagles’ Haven, at 5655 Coral Ridge Drive is open 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday – Friday / 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday. Call 954-203-4249. 

If a parent is concerned that there may be a threat as severe as suicide, call 9-1-1. Additional resources are only a phone call away.

  • 2-1-1     24/7 crisis hotline
  • 954-740-MSD1 (6731)   24/7 crisis hotline
  • Crisis Intervention YES team  954-677-3113, Option 3
  • Crisis Text Line: Text “FL” to 741741 for a live counselor

For additional local resources, visit browardschools.com/CrisisSupport.

The group will continue to work on the campaign and coordinate protocols for when students return to school after Spring break.

 

###

ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth-largest school district in the nation and the second-largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has more than 271,500 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 234 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 88 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. Connect with BCPS: visit the website at browardschools.com, follow BCPS on Twitter @browardschools and Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools, and download the free BCPS mobile app.

Source

Triangle Shirtwaist fire kills 146 in New York City


Year
1911
Month Day
March 25

In one of the darkest moments of America’s industrial history, the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory in New York City burns down, killing 146 workers, on this day in 1911. The tragedy led to the development of a series of laws and regulations that better protected the safety of factory workers.

The Triangle factory, owned by Max Blanck and Isaac Harris, was located in the top three floors of the 10-story Asch Building in downtown Manhattan. It was a sweatshop in every sense of the word: a cramped space lined with work stations and packed with poor immigrant workers, mostly teenaged women who did not speak English. At the time of the fire, there were four elevators with access to the factory floors, but only one was fully operational and it could hold only 12 people at a time. There were two stairways down to the street, but one was locked from the outside to prevent theft by the workers and the other opened inward only. The fire escape, as all would come to see, was shoddily constructed, and could not support the weight of more than a few women at a time.

Blanck and Harris already had a suspicious history of factory fires. The Triangle factory was twice scorched in 1902, while their Diamond Waist Company factory burned twice, in 1907 and in 1910. It seems that Blanck and Harris deliberately torched their workplaces before business hours in order to collect on the large fire-insurance policies they purchased, a not uncommon practice in the early 20th century. While this was not the cause of the 1911 fire, it contributed to the tragedy, as Blanck and Harris refused to install sprinkler systems and take other safety measures in case they needed to burn down their shops again.

READ MORE: How the Horrific Tragedy of the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Led to Workplace Safety Laws

Added to this delinquency were Blanck and Harris’ notorious anti-worker policies. Their employees were paid a mere $15 a week, despite working 12 hours a day, every day. When the International Ladies Garment Workers Union led a strike in 1909 demanding higher pay and shorter and more predictable hours, Blanck and Harris’ company was one of the few manufacturers who resisted, hiring police as thugs to imprison the striking women, and paying off politicians to look the other way.

On March 25, a Saturday afternoon, there were 600 workers at the factory when a fire broke out in a rag bin on the eighth floor. The manager turned the fire hose on it, but the hose was rotted and its valve was rusted shut. Panic ensued as the workers fled to every exit. The elevator broke down after only four trips, and women began jumping down the shaft to their deaths. Those who fled down the wrong set of stairs were trapped inside and burned alive. Other women trapped on the eighth floor began jumping out the windows, which created a problem for the firefighters whose hoses were crushed by falling bodies. Also, the firefighters’ ladders stretched only as high as the seventh floor, and their safety nets were not strong enough to catch the women, who were jumping three at a time.

Blanck and Harris were on the building’s top floor with some workers when the fire broke out. They were able to escape by climbing onto the roof and hopping to an adjoining building.

The fire was out within half an hour, but not before over 140 deaths. The workers’ union organized a march on April 5 to protest the conditions that led to the fire; it was attended by 80,000 people.

Though Blanck and Harris were put on trial for manslaughter, they managed to get off scot-free. Still, the massacre for which they were responsible did finally compel the city to enact reform. In addition to the Sullivan-Hoey Fire Prevention Law passed that October, the New York Democratic set took up the cause of the worker and became known as a reform party.

READ MORE: The Labor Movement: A Timeline

Source

Martin Luther King, Jr. begins the march from Selma to Montgomery


Year
1965
Month Day
March 21

In the name of African American voting rights, 3,200 civil rights demonstrators in Alabama, led by Martin Luther King, Jr., begin a historic march from Selma to Montgomery, the state’s capital. Federalized Alabama National Guardsmen and FBI agents were on hand to provide safe passage for the march, which twice had been turned back by Alabama state police at Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge.

In 1965, King and his Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) decided to make the small town of Selma the focus of their drive to win voting rights for African Americans in the South. Alabama’s governor, George Wallace, was a vocal opponent of the African-American civil rights movement, and local authorities in Selma had consistently thwarted efforts by the Dallas County Voters League and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to register local blacks.

Although Governor Wallace promised to prevent it from going forward, on March 7 some 600 demonstrators, led by SCLC leader Hosea Williams and SNCC leader John Lewis, began the 54-mile march to the state capital. After crossing Edmund Pettus Bridge, they were met by Alabama state troopers and posse men who attacked them with nightsticks, tear gas and whips after they refused to turn back.

READ MORE: Civil Rights Movement Timeline

Several of the protesters were severely beaten, and others ran for their lives. The incident was captured on national television and outraged many Americans.

King, who was in Atlanta at the time, promised to return to Selma immediately and lead another attempt. On March 9, King led another marching attempt, but turned the marchers around when state troopers again blocked the road.

On March 21, U.S. Army troops and federalized Alabama National Guardsmen escorted the marchers across Edmund Pettus Bridge and down Highway 80. When the highway narrowed to two lanes, only 300 marchers were permitted, but thousands more rejoined the Alabama Freedom March as it came into Montgomery on March 25.

On the steps of the Alabama State Capitol, King addressed live television cameras and a crowd of 25,000, just a few hundred feet from the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where he got his start as a minister in 1954.

READ MORE: How Selma’s ‘Bloody Sunday’ Became a Turning Point in the Civil Rights Movement

Source

BCPS Principal Michelle Kefford Named Florida’s 2019 Principal of the Year

March 19, 2019

Principal Michelle Kefford Named Florida’s 2019 Principal of the Year Congratulations to Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) Charles W. Flanagan High School Principal Michelle Kefford for being named Florida’s 2019 Principal of the Year, announced today by the Florida State Board of Education, Florida Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran. As Florida’s Principal of the Year, Kefford was awarded the Principal Achievement Award for Outstanding Leadership and a cash prize of $3,500.

Michelle Kefford has been an educator for more than 19 years and has been the principal at Charles W. Flanagan High School since 2011. With her at the helm, Flanagan High School earned its first ever “A” and has received an “A” for six out of the seven years. Since her tenure as principal, she has initiated several programs including “Kefford’s Kids,” a mentoring program and “Falcon Flyers,” an initiative to enable middle school students to earn high school credits at Flanagan High. As a passionate educator, she has held various positions on District committees; volunteers on several city and county committees; and works continuously to build school pride and staff morale.

“We are extremely proud of Principal Kefford, as she represents a stellar group of education leaders who are the best that our District has to offer,” said BCPS Superintendent Robert W. Runcie. “She has developed numerous programs, which focus on developing relationships, which ultimately benefit her students.”

BCPS Principal Michelle Kefford Named Florida’s 2019 Principal of the Year. Left to Right: State Board of Education Member Michael Olenick, State Board of Education Member Ben Gibson, State Board of Education Chair Marva Johnson, 2019 Principal of the Year Michelle Kefford, Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran, State Board of Education Vice Chair Andy Tuck and State Board of Education Member Tom Grady.


PHOTO CAPTION
: Left to Right: State Board of Education Member Michael Olenick, State Board of Education Member Ben Gibson, State Board of Education Chair Marva Johnson, 2019 Principal of the Year Michelle Kefford, Commissioner of Education Richard Corcoran, State Board of Education Vice Chair Andy Tuck and State Board of Education Member Tom Grady.

 

###

 

ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth-largest school district in the nation and the second-largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has more than 271,500 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 234 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 88 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. Connect with BCPS: visit the website at browardschools.com, follow BCPS on Twitter @browardschools and Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools, and download the free BCPS mobile app.

Source

Florida Coach, Wife Electrocuted While Installing Scoreboard

News in Brief

Officials say a high school baseball coach and his wife were electrocuted while installing a new scoreboard at a Florida baseball field to replace one that had been destroyed by Hurricane Michael.

Liberty County school board member Kyle Peddle said that Coach Corey Crum and a few baseball players and parents were putting up the scoreboard on March 11. Crum was in “some kind of lift, and he got into an electrical line,” Peddle said.

Peddle said Crum’s wife, Shana, came to her husband’s aid and was also electrocuted. The couple’s son, Chase, was injured.

Vol. 38, Issue 26, Page 5

Published in Print: March 20, 2019, as Florida Coach, Wife Electrocuted While Installing Scoreboard

Please enable JavaScript to view the

comments powered by Disqus.

Back to Top Back to Top

Source

Golda Meir elected as Israel’s first female prime minster

Year
1969
Month Day
March 17

On March 17, 1969, 70-year-old Golda Meir makes history when she is elected as Israel’s first female prime minister. She was the country’s fourth prime minister and is still the only woman to have held this post.

Meir, who was born in Kiev, Ukraine and raised in Wisconsin, began her career as a Zionist labor organizer, and later held several positions in Israeli government, including Minister of Labor and Minister of Foreign Affairs. Upon the sudden death of Prime Minister Levi Eshkol in 1969, Meir was chosen as his successor. 

During her tenure, Meir gained a reputation as a savvy diplomat. She saw the country through the Yom Kippur War in October 1973, after Egypt and Syria launched a surprise attack on Israel. Although Israel was victorious, over 2,500 Israelis died, and many criticized the government for a lack of preparedness.

Due in part to her age and ailing health, Meir resigned in October 1974. She was succeeded by Yitzhak Rabin.

Meir died in Jerusalem on December 8, 1978, at the age of 80. 

READ MORE: 7 Women Leaders Who Were Elected to Highest Office

Source

The Battle of the Alamo comes to an end


Year
1836
Month Day
March 06

On March 6, 1836, after 13 days of intermittent fighting, the Battle of the Alamo comes to a gruesome end, capping off a pivotal moment in the Texas Revolution. Mexican forces were victorious in recapturing the fort, and nearly all of the roughly 200 Texan defenders—including legendary frontiersman Davy Crockett—died.

Thirteen days earlier, on February 23, Mexican General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna ordered a siege of the Alamo Mission (near present-day San Antonio), which had been occupied by rebel Texas forces since December. An army of over 1,000 Mexican soldiers began descending on the makeshift fort and setting up artillery.

Over the next two weeks, the two armies traded gunfire, but there were few casualties. Despite being clearly outnumbered, Alamo co-commanders James Bowie and William Travis insisted on remaining in place. The volunteer soldiers defending the Alamo included doctors and farmers, as well as Tennessee frontiersman and Congressman Davy Crockett, who fought in the Tennessee militia.

The final attack came before dawn on March 6. Mexican troops breached the north wall and flooded into the compound, awakening many of the Texans inside. The fighting lasted 90 minutes, some of it hand-to-hand combat. Bowie and Travis were killed, as was Crockett, although reports differ as to exactly how and when. Several Texans reportedly surrendered, but Santa Anna ordered all prisoners be executed. Only a handful survived, mostly women and children. Historians estimate several hundred Mexicans died.

After the battle, the Mexican army marched east. Meanwhile, commander of the Texas forces, Sam Houston had been building and developing his army in Harris County. “Remember the Alamo!” became their rallying cry as an urgent reminder to avenge their earlier defeat. On April 21, Texas and Mexico fought again at the Battle of San Jacinto. Texas was victorious this time, and won independence from Mexico, bringing the Texas Revolution to an end.

The defense of the Alamo remains a symbol of resistance to oppression and revolutionary spirit. The battle has been immortalized in several TV series and films, including 1960’s The Alamo, starring John Wayne as Davy Crockett. 

Source

BCPS Hosts Annual SECME STEM Olympiad

March 12, 2019

SECME STEM Olympiad

WHO:              
Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) Students and Staff
 

WHAT:            
Annual SECME STEM Olympiad

WHEN:            
Saturday, March 16, 2019
8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. 

WHERE:          
Cooper City High School
9401 Stirling Road
Cooper City, FL 33328 

WHY:              
Students of all grade levels, representing approximately 100 District schools, will compete in a variety of STEM-related engineering competitions, including: designing, building and racing mousetrap vehicles, water rockets, generators, bionic

hands and VEX robotics.

This year’s theme is SECME STEM Force: The Brain Awakens. The event includes Star Wars characters from the 501st Legion, in addition to students and families participating in a digital playground with various vendors and exhibitors.

 

MEDIA ARE INVITED TO COVER THIS EVENT.

 

###

 

ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth-largest school district in the nation and the second-largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has more than 271,500 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 234 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 88 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. Connect with BCPS: visit the website at browardschools.com, follow BCPS on Twitter @browardschools and Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools, and download the free BCPS mobile app.

Source

Celebrity Turnaround Artist Black Violin Visits Walker Elementary School and Bethune Elementary School

March 12, 2019

WHO:   
Students from Walker Elementary School and Bethune Elementary School, Celebrity Turnaround Artist Black Violin and School Staff
 

WHAT: 
Students at Walker Elementary and Bethune Elementary will celebrate the infusion of the arts with hip hop string instrumentalists Black Violin. Black Violin will visit several classes at the two schools, perform for the students during assemblies, participate in question and answer sessions, and share personal and motivational stories. Both members of Black Violin, Wil B and Kev Marcus, are graduates of Dillard High School Center for the Arts. 
 

WHEN / WHERE: 
Thursday, March 14, 2019

Walker Elementary School
1001 NW 4th Street, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33311

10 – 11:30 a.m.

Bethune Elementary School
2400 Meade Street, Hollywood, Florida 33020

1:45 – 3:15 p.m. 

WHY:    
Walker Elementary and Bethune Elementary are two of three schools in Broward County Public Schools selected to participate as Turnaround Arts Schools for the past four years. Turnaround Arts, a national program of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, provides resources to schools to increase student achievement, student attendance, and parent and community involvement.  In addition, Turnaround Arts provides art supplies, licensing rights, kits for school musicals, and high-profile Turnaround Arts artists who work with students and teachers.

Black Violin

Pictured above: Black Violin

 

MEDIA ARE INVITED TO COVER THESE EVENTS.

###

 

ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth-largest school district in the nation and the second-largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has more than 271,500 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 234 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 88 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. Connect with BCPS: visit the website at browardschools.com, follow BCPS on Twitter @browardschools and Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools, and download the free BCPS mobile app.

Source