2021 Third Grade FSA English Language Arts Results Released

The Florida Department of Education released the Florida Standards Assessment (FSA) English Language Arts (ELA) summary results for third grade students on June 22, 2021. The results for Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) show 53% of students meeting or exceeding satisfactory performance levels, a decrease from 60% in 2019 (state assessments were not administered in 2020 due to COVID-19). Overall, the state of Florida saw a decrease from 58% in 2019 to 54% in 2021.  

More highlights: 

  • In BCPS, 53% of third grade students participated in brick-and-mortar instruction after the District reopened schools in October 2020. This was the second lowest rate of third grade students being in face-to-face instruction during the 2020/21 school year among the state’s 67 public school districts. Statewide data shows that districts with higher rates of in-person learning experienced more consistent outcomes compared to 2019. 
  • Districtwide, 91% of third grade students tested in 2020/21 while participation statewide was at 97%. At this time, there is no comparison data of participation rates with other districts. 
  • Sixty-eight percent (96 out of 141) of BCPS traditional elementary schools tested 90% or more of third grade students on the Grade 3 FSA-ELA. 
  • Twenty-nine percent (41 out of 141) of BCPS traditional elementary schools tested 95% or more of third grade students on the Grade 3 FSA-ELA.  
  • Despite the challenges of this past year, the following five schools increased performance by 10 percentage points or greater compared to 2019: 

Thurgood Marshall Elementary School (25 points)

Deerfield Beach Elementary School (15 points) 

Silver Palms Elementary School (12 points) 

Sandpiper Elementary School (11 points) 

Mirror Lake Elementary School (10 points) 

The importance of getting students to return to face-to-face learning has been a priority for BCPS, with outreach to families of struggling students to encourage those students to return to brick-and-mortar schools. BCPS has also launched the largest summer learning program in the District’s history to help mitigate learning loss due to the summer slide, when students tend to lose some of the achievement gains made during the school year, as well as the learning loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 

“We commend our outstanding teachers and school leaders for their perseverance in helping our students continue to learn, despite the challenges presented during this past school year,” said BCPS Superintendent Robert W. Runcie. “We are analyzing the achievement data as we develop plans to support every student’s unique learning needs.” 

This year, the state issued Emergency Order 02, which waived the third grade ELA scores as a promotion requirement. BCPS staff will continue to analyze the third grade FSA ELA results to implement support programs for reading development and ELA standard mastery for all students in school year 2021/22. Additionally, the District will provide intensive interventions for students promoted to fourth grade, who scored below a level three on the FSA ELA. Interventions will include high-intensity tutoring, after-school programming, and family engagement initiatives to support reading during out-of-school time. 

 

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ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”  

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth largest school district in the nation and the second largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has nearly 261,500 students and approximately 110,000 adult students in 241 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 92 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 170 different countries and 147 different languages. To connect with BCPS, visit browardschools.com, follow us on Twitter @browardschools, on Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools.com and download the free BCPS mobile app.

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BCPS Awarded $250,000 Grant from Helios Education Foundation to Support Summer 2021 Learning

June 22, 2021

BCPS Awarded $250,000 Grant from Helios Education Foundation

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) Summer 2021 experience for the District’s youngest learners is getting a boost, thanks to a grant from Helios Education Foundation. The Foundation awarded BCPS $250,000 to help ensure students who just completed kindergarten are prepared to be successful when they begin first grade in the 2021/22 school year.

The grant is supporting a reading acceleration initiative for kindergarten students in the District’s summer program at five sites, including Challenger Elementary School, Driftwood Elementary School, Lakeside Elementary School, Stirling Elementary School and Tradewinds Elementary School. Each of these schools is serving as a feeder site, welcoming their students and students who attend other District schools during the regular school year.

During the six-week program, the students participate in four hours of intensive reading and writing instruction each school day. They also enjoy debate, music and art activities. The reading acceleration initiative aims to mitigate the summer slide, when students tend to lose some of the achievement gains made during the school year, as well as the impact of learning loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

BCPS partnered with Scholastic to develop the reading acceleration pilot program and curriculum. As the students enter first grade, they will continue to be monitored for their academic progress and growth.

The District’s Summer 2021 learning experience began on Monday, June 21, and runs through July 29. To learn more about the educational opportunities available for students in pre-K through 12th grade, visit browardschools.com/Summer2021.

For more information on Helios Education Foundation, visit helios.org.

 

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ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”  

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth largest school district in the nation and the second largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has nearly 261,500 students and approximately 110,000 adult students in 241 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 92 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 170 different countries and 147 different languages. To connect with BCPS, visit browardschools.com, follow us on Twitter @browardschools, on Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools.com and download the free BCPS mobile app.

 

ABOUT THE HELIOS EDUCATION FOUNDATION

Helios Education Foundation is dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. The Foundation’s work is driven by four fundamental beliefs in Community, Investment, Equity and Partnership.  Helios invests in programs and initiatives across the full education continuum – from early grade success through postsecondary education. In Arizona, where Latino students comprise a large proportion of the K-12 public school population, the Foundation is implementing its Arizona Latino Student Success initiative focused on preparing all students – especially students in high poverty, underserved Latino communities – for success.  Through Helios’ Florida Regional Student Success Initiative, the Foundation is helping first-generation, minority, and underrepresented students from the state’s large population centers of South Florida, Central Florida, and Tampa Bay achieve a postsecondary education. Since 2006, the Foundation has invested more than $261 million in education programs and initiatives in both states. To learn more about Helios Education Foundation, visit www.helios.org.

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Lawrence v. Texas is decided

On June 26, 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court strikes down Texas’ sodomy laws, along with similar laws in 13 other states. The decision in Lawrence v. Texas is a landmark one, reaffirming the existence of a “right to privacy” that is not enumerated in the Constitution and effectively legalizing same-sex sexual activity in the United States.

Although enforced sporadically by the 21st century, laws against homosexual sex were ubiquitous in America as late as 1960, when every state had one. Over a dozen states still considered gay sex a crime in September of 1998, when police responded to reports of someone brandishing a gun in the Harris County, Texas apartment of John Lawrence. Upon entering the apartment, they discovered Lawrence having sex with another man and arrested him under Texas’ “Homosexual Conduct” law, which barred “deviate sexual intercourse with another individual of the same sex.”

Five years later, the Supreme Court heard the case. Lawyers for the State of Texas tried to draw a distinction between the privacy of “a marital bedroom” and the circumstances of the case, but the Court sided with Lawrence. In a 6-3 decision, it ruled that “The state cannot demean [anyone’s] existence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime,” finding that the right to privacy that underpinned the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision also covered sex among consenting adults. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas dissented, with Scalia writing that “The court has largely signed on to the so-called homosexual agenda” and “taken sides in the culture war,” adding that he had “nothing against homosexuals.” Overnight, gay sex became legal in the United States, paving the way for further acceptance of homosexuality in the coming years.

READ MORE: The Supreme Court Rulings That Have Shaped Gay Rights in America

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Broward County Public Schools Kicks Off BCPS Summer 2021 Experience

June 17, 2021

BCPS Summer 2021

Superintendent’s News Conference and First Day Schedule on Monday, June 21

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) welcomes students to BCPS Summer 2021: Get Back! Get Ready! Reconnect! on Monday, June 21, 2021. The academic summer experience offers a variety of specialized programs to help students academically and provide enrichment opportunities that will prepare them for the upcoming school year. The free six-week program includes 45,000 students in pre-K through 12th grade and is hosted at 96 schools across the District. Classes are held Monday through Thursday, for four hours each day. Morning childcare, as well as afternoon camps and activities, are available to round out a full day experience for students (these may be fee-based, depending on the service).

BCPS Superintendent Robert W. Runcie will visit three schools on Monday, June 21, welcoming students, teachers and staff to the first day of the summer experience. He will wrap up his tour of schools with a news conference immediately following his visit at Wilton Manors Elementary School. The approximate start time for the news conference is 11:30 a.m. Below is the Superintendent’s first day of BCPS Summer 2021 school visits schedule. Media are invited to cover the news conference and school visits.

Superintendent Runcie’s first day schedule for BCPS Summer 2021: Get Back! Get Ready! Reconnect!

 8:15 a.m.
Hollywood Hills High School  
5400 Stirling Road
Hollywood, FL 33021

 9:30 a.m. 
Bair Middle School 
9100 NW 21st Manor
Sunrise, FL 33322

10:45 a.m. 
Wilton Manors Elementary School  
2401 NE 3rd Avenue
Wilton Manors, FL 33305

11:30 a.m. (approximately)
BCPS Summer 2021 First Day News Conference (at Wilton Manors Elementary)

Superintendent Runcie will be joined by School Board members for a wrap up of the first day of the summer learning experience.

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ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth largest school district in the nation and the second largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has nearly 270,000 students and approximately 175,000 adult students in 241 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 89 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 204 different countries and 191 different languages. To connect with BCPS, visit browardschools.com, follow us on Twitter @browardschools, on Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools.com and download the free BCPS mobile app.

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“Solidarity Day” rally at Resurrection City

On June 19, 1968, a long-term anti-poverty demonstration known as Resurrection City reaches its high-water mark. On “Solidarity Day,” over 50,000 people flock to the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. to protest, sing, hear speeches and demonstrate on behalf of national legislation to address the plight of the American poor. “Today is really only the beginning,” Rev. Ralph Abernathy tells the crowd. “We will not give up the battle until the Congress of the United States decides to open the doors of America and allow the nation’s poor to enter as full-fledged citizens into this land of wealth and opportunity.”

In May 1968, poor people from all over the country came to the National Mall and made temporary homes in plywood shelters, creating a settlement they called Resurrection City. The protest began less than two months after the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and grew out of the Poor People’s Campaign and the campaign for an Economic Bill of Rights, both of which had been major focuses of King’s at the time of his death. The goal was to convince legislators of the need for laws that would lift poor people of all races out of poverty, and to sway public opinion by making the plight of the poor impossible to ignore. Protesters came from all over the country—“caravans” drove from as far away as Los Angeles and Seattle while a “Freedom Train” brought people from Memphis and one group from Marks, Mississippi rode mule-drawn wagons.

READ MORE: When Protesters Occupied D.C. for Six Weeks to Demand Economic Justice

Marches and demonstrations took place in Washington as more and more activists arrived throughout May, including a Mother’s Day march organized by the National Welfare Rights Organization and led by Coretta Scott King. Ethel Kennedy, wife of Sen. Robert Kennedy, was involved with the demonstrations, and his funeral procession stopped at Resurrection City on June 8, following his assassination on June 5. Businesses, schools and other fixtures of normal life flourished within the settlement, which also saw conflicts stemming from animosities between different groups living there, leadership disputes and the inherent uncertainty of living in makeshift dwellings on the National Mall. During this time, leaders of the movement met and testified before members of Congress. The Rev. Jesse Jackson, dubbed the “mayor” of Resurrection City, sought to lift spirits with his sermons, one of which became famous for the chant of “I am somebody!” which temporarily re-energized the protesters. The original permit issued by the National Parks Service expired a few days before Solidarity Day, but it was extended by four days.

After being moved due to an internal conflict among organizers, Solidarity Day took place on Juneteenth and was attended by over 50,000 people. Abernathy and Coretta Scott King spoke, along with leaders of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Native American activist Martha Grass, the president of the United Auto Workers (80 busloads of UAW members were in attendance) and Democratic presidential hopefuls Eugene McCarthy and Hubert Humphrey.

The day may well have gone down as a powerful and peaceful day of activism on par with the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, but the conclusion to the story of Resurrection City was far less inspiring. Allegedly in response to rocks thrown at them from the camp, and with the Parks Service permit expiring, the police moved to evict residents on June 23, firing tear gas into Resurrection City and rounding up its occupants for arrest. One SCLC leader remembered the eviction as “worse than anything I saw in Mississippi or Alabama.”

Today, Solidarity Day and Resurrection City are footnotes in the overall story of the civil rights movement, overshadowed by earlier, more successful protests and by the violence and conflict that defined 1968. At the time, however, the settlement by the Reflecting Pool was impossible to ignore—particularly for lawmakers and residents of Washington, D.C.—and regardless of its failure to achieve sweeping social change or anti-poverty legislation, it remains one of the largest and most sustained social justice protests in the history of the United States.

READ MORE: Civil Rights Movement Timeline

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High School Seniors Experiencing Housing Instability Receive Special Graduation Send-Off

June 11, 2021

WHO:
Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) Homeless Education Assistance Resource Team (HEART).

WHAT:               
Approximately 75 graduating seniors from the Class of 2021, who receive assistance from HEART, participate in a drive-thru celebration where they’re equipped with some of the essentials they will need as they embark on their post-secondary education or military journey.

WHY:                 
As seniors prepare for the next stage in their education, HEART teamed up with the Broward Education Foundation, Destination Dorm, Children’s Services Council, The Frederick A. DeLuca Foundation and Immanuel Temple Church (a ministry of the African Methodist Episcopal Church) to ensure these students have what they need to make their dorm rooms and living quarters feel more like home. Each student received dorm room necessities, such as a comforter, pillows, bedsheets, towels, shower basics, storage drawers, a standing lamp and other useful items, in addition to a new laptop computer, a gift card and a congratulatory letter from BCPS Superintendent Robert W. Runcie.

HEART provides continuous support to thousands of BCPS students experiencing homelessness, with the goal of removing the barriers that prevent them from enrolling, attending and succeeding in school.

MEDIA NOTE:    

To obtain b-roll and recorded interviews from the drive-thru Senior Send-off held Friday, June 11, at Lauderdale Manors Early Learning & Family Resource Center, contact the Office of Communications at bcps.pio@browardschools.com.

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ABOUT BROWARD COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

“Committed to educating all students to reach their highest potential.”  

Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) is the sixth largest school district in the nation and the second largest in the state of Florida. BCPS is Florida’s first fully accredited school system since 1962. BCPS has nearly 261,500 students and approximately 110,000 adult students in 241 schools, centers and technical colleges, and 92 charter schools. BCPS serves a diverse student population, with students representing 177 different countries and 151 different languages. To connect with BCPS, visit browardschools.com, follow us on Twitter @browardschools, on Facebook at facebook.com/browardschools.com and download the free BCPS mobile app.

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Summer Work Days 2021

June 8, 2021

Summer Work Days schedule for 2021As a result of the success and savings generated from the Summer Work Days program in previous years, the District continues the Summer Work Days schedule for 2021.

The 2021 Summer Work Days schedule begins the week of Monday, June 14, and ends August 6. During this time, schools and administrative offices will have extended hours of service Monday through Thursday and will be closed on Fridays. In observance of the July 4th holiday, which falls on a Sunday, the District will be closed on Monday, July 5.  Employees will follow their normal workday schedules on Tuesday, July 6 through Friday, July 9.

The District will resume its normal schedule of work hours on Monday, August 9.

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Take the Library of Congress Survey

Over the past year, like you, the Library of Congress has adjusted, recalibrated and learned. We want to continue to learn from you about what more we can do. As a friend of the Library of Congress, your feedback is critical to us as we look to the future. The Library of Congress is your library and we want to build plans based on YOU.

Please take a moment to complete the survey and share more about how you’ve engaged with the Library, what we can do better, and what more you want to see from us. No matter where you are in the country (or world!), or how you’ve connected with the Library before – we want your feedback.

Take the survey: https://wh.snapsurveys.com/s.asp?k=162090351735&src=1

The survey will close in 10 days, so please take 10 minutes to complete it now. We look forward to sharing the insights we learn and, most importantly, using your feedback to chart the path forward.

Thanks for your time!

Carla Hayden
Librarian of Congress

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Today in History – June 5

On June 5, 1851, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life Among the Lowly began to appear in serial form in The National Era, an abolitionist weekly published in Washington, D.C. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery story was published in forty installments over the next ten months. For her story Mrs. Stowe was paid $300.

In matters of art there is but one rule, to paint and to move. And where shall we find conditions more complete, types more vivid, situations more touching, more original, than in Uncle Tom?

George Sand

Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1811-1896. [ca. 1880]. Prints & Photographs Division

Although the National Era had a limited circulation, its audience increased as reader after reader passed their copies along to one another. In March 1852, a Boston publisher decided to issue Uncle Tom’s Cabin External as a book and it became an instant best seller. Three hundred thousand copies were sold the first year, and about two million copies were sold worldwide by 1857. For a three-month period Stowe reportedly received $10,000 in royalties. Across the nation people discussed the novel and debated the most pressing sociopolitical issue dramatized in its narrative—slavery.

Because Uncle Tom’s Cabin so polarized the abolitionist and anti-abolitionist debate, some claim that it is one of the causes of the Civil War. Indeed, when President Lincoln received its author, Harriet Beecher Stowe, at the White House in 1862, legend has it he exclaimed, “So this is the little lady who made this big war?”

For some sixty-five years after its debut, Uncle Tom’s Cabin was frequently presented on stage. According to the article “The Negro on the American Stage External,” as late as 1913 there were “about four Uncle Tom’s Cabin Companies en tour, and at least two of them…doing a good business.” By the late 1800s, however, productions often caricatured Stowe’s more carefully depicted literary figures. While at first white actors usually played all the parts (rendering characters such as the slaves Uncle Tom, Eliza, and Little Eva in blackface), some productions starred African-American actors and singers.

Theatrical Posters

A black actor, Sam Lucas (for whom the song “Uncle Tom’s Gwine to Stay External” was written) first played the title role on film in 1914. By 1927, at least seven silent film versions of Uncle Tom’s Cabin had been made. More recently, The King and I — a Broadway play, movie, and animated feature film — contains a stylized version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin within its own story. Over time Uncle Tom’s Cabin has been translated into at least twenty-three languages.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin. [Uncle Tom]. N.Y.: A.S. Seer’s Union Square Print, c1886. Posters: Performing Arts Posters. Prints & Photographs Division
George Peck’s Grand Revival of Stetson’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin…[Legree]. N.Y.: A.S. Seer’s Litho. Print, [1886]. Posters: Performing Arts Posters. Prints & Photographs Division
George Peck’s Grand Revival of Stetson’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin…[Eliza].. N.Y.: A.S. Seer’s Union Square Print., [1886]. Posters: Performing Arts Posters. Prints & Photographs Division
Uncle Tom’s Cabin. [Topsy]. N.Y.: A.S. Seer’s Union Square Print., [1886]. Posters: Performing Arts Posters. Prints & Photographs Division
Poster for Production of Uncle Tom’s Cabin External, Monday, September 27 (year unknown). The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 External

This poster publicized Harmount’s production of Uncle Tom’s Cabin at the Wilmington, Ohio, Opera House. Harmount’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin Company, based in Williamsport, Ohio, was a theatrical road show company which operated from 1903-29.

Title Card for Uncle Tom’s Cabin, ca. 1910. H. A. Molzon Company. Motion Picture, Broadcasting & Recorded Division. The African-American Mosaic

This title card, used in theater lobbies to advertise the film, is from a rare issue of a thirty-minute silent film version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin originally released by Vitagraph Studio in 1910. Directed by J. Stuart Blackton, a noted director of the period, this version featured Maurice Costello, Clara Kimball Young, and Norma Talmadge, all of whom became major stars.

Anthony Burns. John Andrews, engraver; Boston, Massachusetts: R. M. Edwards, printer, c1855. Cartoon Prints, American. Prints & Photographs Division

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First scientific report on AIDS is published

On June 5, 1981, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention publishes an article in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report describing five cases of a rare lung infection, PCP, in young, otherwise healthy gay men in Los Angeles. It was unknown at the time, but the article is describing the effects of AIDS. Today, the article’s publication is often cited as the beginning of the AIDS crisis.

The article prompted medical professionals around the country, particularly in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, to send the CDC information about similar, mysterious cases. Because it is first detected circulating among gay men, Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, as it will be dubbed the following year, was colloquially referred to as “gay cancer” and formally dubbed Gay-Related Immune Deficiency before the term AIDS was coined in 1982. 

AIDS is not lethal in and of itself—rather, it severely impacts the immune system’s ability to fight off illness, leaving the patient vulnerable to all manner of infections, particularly “opportunistic infections.” PCP is one such opportunistic infection, and it was one of a handful of illnesses whose increased occurrence in the year 1981 revealed that there was an HIV/AIDS epidemic. Within a few years, the AIDS epidemic became the major public health crisis of the late 20th century, although many continued to believe it only affected gay men. Due largely to the misconception that it was a “gay disease,” it would be two years before the New York Times published its first front-page article about AIDS and four years before then-President Ronald Reagan first mentioned it publicly.

Two of the men mentioned in the study were dead by the time it was published, and the three others died a short time later. By the end of the millennium, nearly 775,000 Americans died of AIDS-related illnesses. 

READ MORE: How AIDS Remained an Unspoken—But Deadly—Epidemic

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